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November 24th, 2008

3 things that make gastritis worse

Hi my friend,

Lately I've been seeing a LOT of emails asking about
gastritis.

It's not as "en vogue" as acid reflux or diverticulitis,
but untold numbers of people of varying ages suffer from it.

Simply put, gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach
lining.

It's not a true "stand alone" condition--it's usually the
result of something else.   

That "something else" can be drinking too much alcohol,
longstanding use of anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or
ibuprofen, or a bacterial infection like Helicobacter
pylori (H. pylori).

Sometimes people develop gastritis after having major
surgery or suffering a traumatic injury or burns.

It's also seen in people who have diseases like pernicious
anemia, autoimmune disorders, and chronic bile reflux. 

The symptoms are very similar to an ulcer and include
nausea, stomach pain, bloating, vomiting, burning in the
abdomen or a really stuffed feeling in the stomach.

Gastritis sufferers may also have stomach bleeding, which
can lead to anemia and blood in their stool. 

Doctors diagnose gastritis after one or more tests: 

1- Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy

The doctor slides a thin tube with a little camera on the
end down your throat (you're sedated--thank God) and into
your stomach to look for inflammation in the stomach
lining.  He/she may also take a biopsy (remove a tiny
sample of tissue for tests).

2- Blood test

People who have stomach bleeding with gastritis are
commonly anemic, so the doctor may check your red blood
cell count to see if you have anemia. 

3- Stool test

This test checks for blood in your stool, another sign of
stomach bleeding.  It can also detect H. pylori bacteria in
the digestive tract.


The tests for diagnosing gastritis are pretty thorough.

But the treatments are where the ball is commonly dropped. 

The typical treatment of gastritis almost guarantees a
nice long time (maybe a lifetime) of being a prisoner to
drugs. 

Here's what I mean:

Gastritis treatment usually involves taking drugs to
reduce stomach acid--antacids, H2 blockers and PPIs (proton
pump inhibitors).  

I just got a mental picture of a purple pill, dressed as a
knight in shining armor, rushing in on its white horse!

Avoiding spicy foods, beverages, or medicines may also be
recommended.

But NONE of these suggestions will completely address the
gastritis problem, some will do nothing for it, and others
will make it even worse!

First of all, if gastritis is caused by H. Pylori
bacteria, then it makes sense that an antibiotic would be
needed for the bacterial infection.  That can't be argued.

And if someone is drinking too much or taking too many
anti-inflammatories that are causing gastritis, then yes,
those should be avoided too.

But avoiding spicy foods?  Why?  Spicy foods are not and
never have been the problem behind gastritis, ulcers, acid
reflux or any other stomach disorder.  All that avoiding
spicy foods will do is sentence the person to a lifetime of
bland, tasteless meals. 

The antacids, H2 blockers and PPIs are the BIG offenders. 

THEY make the problem worse! 

Here's how:

-- Antacids neutralize the acid in your stomach. 
-- H2 blockers stop the action of histamine (a hormone that
    signals the stomach to secrete acid). 
-- Proton pump inhibitors shut down the little "pumps" in
   the acid-secreting cells of the stomach.

But stomach NEEDS acid to properly digest protein.  So
when you take a drug to neutralize or prevent stomach acid,
you're bringing the digestion of your foods to a screeching
halt. 

Sure, you might get relief from the burning or pain
temporarily.  But trouble will still be brewing.

When your digestion is thwarted, your stomach notices
there's a problem, so it tries to secrete MORE acid to jump-
start digestion again. 

And if you're an antacid user, you reach for another Tums. 

If you're an H2 blocker or PPI user, the stomach will get
nowhere with its acid secretion efforts anyway.



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And either way, your food is STILL sitting there in the
stomach, not properly digested, and starting to rot and
putrefy.

This is when World War III starts in your gut.  I'm
talking about gas, pain, cramps and beach ball sized
bloating. 

And while your food is sitting there rotting, all of the
useful vitamins and nutrients in it are destroyed.  Poof!
They are dead.

Since your body's hunger signal is triggered by a need for
the nutrients in the food (not just something to fill the
space), and it hasn't gotten any, so you feel hungry again.

And heaven forbid if you eat something -- you'll start the
acid-drug-acid-drug cycle all over again!

Now tell me, how can this whole scenario possibly HELP
someone heal from gastritis?

The answer:  It can't.  It makes it worse. 

All of that poor digestion, rotting food and repeated acid
secretion makes an already inflamed stomach even worse. 

And that's why people who take drugs for gastritis can be
on them for YEARS.  Because they do nothing for the problem
and never will.

Here is what REALLY helps gastritis.  Ready? 

Foods that heal, and food combinations that heal.

When you have a diet of mainly alkaline foods and eat
foods together that are compatible in the stomach, it can
accomplish its job easily and without overproduction of
acid. 

Your food is digested quickly (usually within 3 hours) and
passes through to the intestines nice and easy. 

When you keep the acid low in your stomach naturally with
your foods, (and not mask your symptoms with pills), you
begin healing your gastritis.

The simple, easy to understand advice I teach in the Great
Taste No Pain Health System shows you exactly what to do.

Every day.  Every meal.  It's super easy.  It's positively
delicious.  And it's THE answer to gastritis that really
works. 

If you own Great Taste No Pain, do what it says to do.  If
you don't, learn about it and get it here:
- http://www.greattastenopain.com/great.asp

To your (gastric) health,

Sherry Brescia

PS:  Ernesto said goodbye to 36 years of pills and
gastritis:

*******************

Hi Sherry,
 
I found your plan last week (Monday) surfing the internet
and started taking your Great Taste No Pain plan.

I was diagnosed with gastritis and acid reflux at the age
of 20. 

I was in more or less constant pain with my stomach and
the specialist prescribed drugs and told me to avoid
alcohol and take my meal & snacks regularly (on time diet).

I was on the medication for 36 years but I didn't feel it
was of much benefit.  The pain in my stomach would be gone
for a period of time then come back again.

I also read about all the side-effects of the medication -
the primary one being that reducing stomach acid
production leads to undigested food passing through the gut
and hence nutrient absorption being reduced, etc.

I started your plan and decided to stop immediately taking
my medication.  My stomach was much calmer at this stage
and over a week into the plan I can say that I am
pain free now pretty much all the time, which I feel shows
I am well on the road to total recovery.

I have also found that my energy levels are much more
even, I have totally kicked my red wine and smoking habit
and drink herbal or green tea instead.

I was a big rice-eater (1 big plate rice per meal, good
for 2) but have given your recipes a try and must say I am
a convert - I ate your Greek salad last night and must say
it was delicious and very satisfying.

I have felt much better on the plan and have also lost
some weight effortlessly which is beneficial as I could do
with reducing my waistline somewhat!

Overall I must say that I am delighted with your plan. By
the way, I'm 56 years old now.  Just celebrated last October.

More Power to you, your family, and your work.
 
I hope and pray that all medical community in the world
will see the light!
 
May our Lord GOD bless us all.

Thank you and Best regards,
 
Ernesto

*******************

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